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Lalparu Sunar gives a speech on women’s rights: Photo: Tara Chand
Lalparu Sunar grew up in a poor family in the remote Karnali region. She was unable to read and write. After her participation in a literacy group for women she had the courage to run for local office - and was elected. By Asha Budha Magar, Mission East Nepal, September 2017 Lalparu Sunar wanted to open a bank account. She lived with her husband and four children in a small shed on a tiny plot of land. They were only able to grow enough food to last them four months per year. The rest of the year, her husband had to work as a labourer, either locally or in neighbouring India. That is why...
Landslides and floods have made thousands of families homeless. Mission East helps the most vulnerable. Photo: Parmila Singh, NNDSWO
Landslides and floods in Nepal have made thousands of families homeless. Massive bodies of water have washed away food and kitchen utensils. Through a local partner, Mission East now provides families with shelter materials, kitchen utensils and access to clean water. August 25th 2017  While Nepal is still struggling to recover from two powerful earthquakes in 2015, the country is yet again affected by a severe natural disaster. Over 80,000 families have lost their homes in floods and landslides after heavy rainfall hit the country on August 11th. According to the authorities, 143 people have...
Mohan Khadka (in the dark blue shirt) is being trained in first aid. Photo: Bibek Karki
Mission East aims to enable people in remote communities to respond quickly and effectively when the next disaster strikes. By Lizz Harrison, Disaster Risk Reduction Programme Manager, Mission East Nepal Just over two years ago, Nepal was devastated by two major earthquakes hitting within weeks of each other and causing massive destruction. Almost 9,000 people were killed and 20,000 more were injured.  Mission East and its partners responded with life-saving support, but some of the most remote communities were not reached for days due to difficult terrain, landslides and blocked roads. In...
Mission East is training local communities in how to handle disasters. In this photograph, local villagers are trained in search and rescue work. Photo: Bibek Karki
Mission East saves lives in Nepal – now and many years ahead – by training the population to reduce the risk of disasters. Lizz Harrison, an expert in disaster risk reduction, and explains how. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer, July 3 2017 When a disaster strikes, it may destroy people’s lives, homes and livelihood. It may also cause a lot of damage to a country’s economy. If the country is poor, it is much more difficult to respond to the disaster, and its development may come to a standstill. That is why it is important to help developing countries prepare for natural hazards like...
Laxmi Shahi had a tough childhood before moving into the HEAD Vision Home. Photo: Mission East
The partner organisation of Mission East, HEAD Nepal, locates blind and partially sighted children in remote mountain villages and ensures that they attend school. Laxmi Shahi is one of these children. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer Laxmi Shahi from Nepal’s remote Humla District is partially sighted, but she is doing very well at school. She is one of the best students in her class and aims to become a teacher for other children with disabilities. Just a few years ago, there was little prospect that Laxmi’s life would turn out this way. From a very early age, the odds were stacked...
Patrick Sweeting (left) with Gobindra from Mission East’s local partner organisation, KIRDARC, on a road in Mugu District that is being built with manual labour. It will take years before it is completed. Photo: Mission East
The Mission East Country Director for Nepal realises that it can be expensive to work in the most remote parts of the country. But it is also necessary, he says, given that Mission East aims to reach the most vulnerable. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer When Patrick Sweeting began to visit Nepal’s remote Karnali Region to inspect Mission East projects, he quickly understood that you must go the extra mile to find the most vulnerable people. “When you go to remote areas, you can never actually stop going far enough. You go to a village and think that this must be the most unreached...
Six-year old Ram was not born blind, but he was born poor. When he was four, he lost his eyesight after being beaten by his brothers.
A blind Nepalese boy was forced to live in a cowshed. Now Ram is flourishing at a home that is run by Mission East’s partner organisation, HEAD Nepal. By Patrick Sweeting, Mission East Country Director, Nepal Ram Banadur Shahi, a six-year old boy, was not born blind, but he was born poor. As the youngest son of a poor farmer in the mountainous and arid region of Humla District in western Nepal, he could have expected a hard life, but nobody could have predicted the terrible fate that awaited him. His father is disabled and unable to look after the family and, when Ram was only four years old...
Dhainakot, Nepal, 2006. “Her parents were not alive anymore, and she lived with her grandparents who quite obviously did not want her. At their advanced age, they had sufficient problems feeding themselves,” Graeme Glover said about the little girl he met in the village of Dhainakot in western Nepal. Photo: Mission East
Since 2006, Mission East has worked to develop remote mountain communities in western Nepal. The poverty-stricken population has found new opportunities and hope for the future. A permanent presence in the country also enables Mission East to respond quickly to disaster situations. By Line Højland, Communications Officer Just before noon on Saturday 25 April 2015, Nepal was struck by the worst earthquake for decades. Within a few seconds, entire villages and centuries-old buildings were turned into rubble by the powerful tremors, measuring 7,8 on the Richter scale. More than 8,700 people...

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