Armenian refugees from Kessab in Syria | Mission East

Armenian refugees from Kessab in Syria



Armenian refugees archive foto

Facts about Mission East’s support for Syrian refugees

Mission East supports Syrian refugees in Lebanon with humanitarian relief such as providing shelters, mattresses, blankets, clothing and medicine. 

Normally, we support all refugees regardless of their ethnic and religious background, but in this particular case this fundraising campaign is geared specifically to meet the needs of the Armenian refugees from Kessab.


 

 

 

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Support the Armenian refugees from Kessab in Syria

Mission East is collecting funds to help the refugees from the Christian Armenian town Kessab in Syria. All 3,500 residents have been displaced from the historical town. The inhabitants are now facing a very uncertain life as refugees or as internally displaced individuals in the war-torn country.

“Mission East wants to make a special effort for the victims from Kessab. The religious minorities in Syria have suffered from persecutions, and both the Arab and Armenian Christians are under a considerable amount of pressure. Through this fundraising campaign we would like to support these persecuted minorities,” says Managing Director of Mission East, Kim Hartzner.

According to Kim Hartzner the 3500 Christian refugees from Kessab are descendants of the survivors of the Armenian genocide that took place in the Ottoman Empire during and after World War I. Approximately 1.5 million Armenians died during the genocide.

"In the middle of the Syrian civil war, we are witnessing yet another tragic chapter in the history of the Christian Armenians. During World War I, the Armenian people were driven into exile, and now history is repeating itself. The world must not lose focus on Syria and on the grave violations of human rights that take place daily. The world is closing its eyes, but we must not forget Syria and the victims of the civil war. Millions of people still need help, and the situation is getting increasingly desperate," says Kim Hartzner.