| Mission East
Widows must not be forgotten in relief aid
Mission East works on helping the most vulnerable groups in society. Ujjali aged 84 is one of them. Mission East distributes relief aid in nine villages northeast of Kathmandu and makes sure that the most vulnerable groups in society – e.g. elderly and people with disabilities – get tarpaulins and hygiene kits to withstand cold weather, rain and infectious diseases. “In emergencies like this, the most vulnerable groups such as the elderly, people with disabilities, minorities and Dalit people are often overlooked in the relief work, although they have the greatest needs,” Bandana Shrestha,...
Mission East distribution
On Saturday 2nd of May, Mission East distributed tarpaulins and hygiene kits to earthquake victims in four villages close to one of the earthquake’s epicenters northeast of Kathmandu. The gratitude was moving, says Mission East employee. On Saturday, three trucks filled with tarpaulins  and hygiene kits from Mission East reached earthquake victims in four remote communities of  Sindhupalchowk district northeast of Nepal’s capital Kathmandu, seven days after a powerful earthquake hit Nepal on April 25th. The aid of Mission East is targeting more than 2,000 homeless families living in an area,...
Humla and Mugu are two of the most remote and impoverished districts in Nepal. Humla is only accessible by air and Mugu by just a seasonal road connection. The isolated geography coupled with poverty, low education, poor health, and deep-rooted harmful socio-cultural practices have narrowed opportunities especially for women to lift themselves out of poverty. To address it, Mission East with the funding from CISU and with its implementing partners KIRDARC and WWS, have engaged into a long-term action to empower women, and make their voices heard by their communities, political leaders, and...
Mohan Khadka (in the dark blue shirt) is being trained in first aid. Photo: Bibek Karki
Mission East aims to enable people in remote communities to respond quickly and effectively when the next disaster strikes. By Lizz Harrison, Disaster Risk Reduction Programme Manager, Mission East Nepal Just over two years ago, Nepal was devastated by two major earthquakes hitting within weeks of each other and causing massive destruction. Almost 9,000 people were killed and 20,000 more were injured.  Mission East and its partners responded with life-saving support, but some of the most remote communities were not reached for days due to difficult terrain, landslides and blocked roads. In...
Laxmi Shahi had a tough childhood before moving into the HEAD Vision Home. Photo: Mission East
The partner organisation of Mission East, HEAD Nepal, locates blind and partially sighted children in remote mountain villages and ensures that they attend school. Laxmi Shahi is one of these children. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer Laxmi Shahi from Nepal’s remote Humla District is partially sighted, but she is doing very well at school. She is one of the best students in her class and aims to become a teacher for other children with disabilities. Just a few years ago, there was little prospect that Laxmi’s life would turn out this way. From a very early age, the odds were stacked...
Six-year old Ram was not born blind, but he was born poor. When he was four, he lost his eyesight after being beaten by his brothers.
A blind Nepalese boy was forced to live in a cowshed. Now Ram is flourishing at a home that is run by Mission East’s partner organisation, HEAD Nepal. By Patrick Sweeting, Mission East Country Director, Nepal Ram Banadur Shahi, a six-year old boy, was not born blind, but he was born poor. As the youngest son of a poor farmer in the mountainous and arid region of Humla District in western Nepal, he could have expected a hard life, but nobody could have predicted the terrible fate that awaited him. His father is disabled and unable to look after the family and, when Ram was only four years old...
Dhainakot, Nepal, 2006. “Her parents were not alive anymore, and she lived with her grandparents who quite obviously did not want her. At their advanced age, they had sufficient problems feeding themselves,” Graeme Glover said about the little girl he met in the village of Dhainakot in western Nepal. Photo: Mission East
Since 2006, Mission East has worked to develop remote mountain communities in western Nepal. The poverty-stricken population has found new opportunities and hope for the future. A permanent presence in the country also enables Mission East to respond quickly to disaster situations. By Line Højland, Communications Officer Just before noon on Saturday 25 April 2015, Nepal was struck by the worst earthquake for decades. Within a few seconds, entire villages and centuries-old buildings were turned into rubble by the powerful tremors, measuring 7,8 on the Richter scale. More than 8,700 people...
Dalli’s dream has always been to get a water tap near her house. With help from Mission East this dream has now come true.
Dalli saw her house crumble when the earthquake struck Nepal last spring. The 44-year-old woman and her children had to sleep in the open until Mission East provided material for shelter and hygiene. Now the work continues to secure the future for other vulnerable families. Dalli was working in her vegetable garden when the earth suddenly began to shake beneath her. Together with her four-year-old daughter, whom she took on her back, she climbed down the steep hillside. "I was unable to walk upright and had to crawl to a piece of flat land," she says. “It shook very heavily and I thought that...

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