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350 school children from Taegok Ri village have received new latrines and been taught about hygiene. This minimises the risk of diarrhea. Photo: Mission East
Mission East is helping North Korean families protect themselves against contagious diseases and produce more food – for the benefit of themselves and their environment. By Line Højland, Communications Officer, Oktober 2017 The inhabitants of Taegok Ri village in the southeastern part of North Korea do not have enough food. That is why they cultivate as much land as they can – in the valley as well as on the surrounding hill slopes. However, their way of farming may have disastrous consequences. To farm their land, they have to cut down trees that protect the soil and prevent mud slides...
Mrs Kim Kyong Ok in front of her temporary shelter in Musan County where she is living with her daughter and son-in-law. In her village, 200 families lost their homes, 14 people died, and many more are missing.
Heavy floods in North Hamyong province have made thousands of people homeless. Mission East is one of the few international aid organisations in the area and provides clean drinking water and hygiene training so that the local population is not infected by dirty river water. By Svend Løbner, freelance journalist Kim Kyong Ok is sitting at the entrance to the tent that she inhabits together with her daughter and son-in-law. She is surrounded by a few modest objects – some cooking gear, a bicycle and a pair of shoes. The middle-aged North Korean woman and her family did not manage to take all...
Kim Juyang Hui lives with her husband and their son in one of the houses that were built after the typhoon in 2012 with help from Mission East. Now the family has also clean water available.
When there is a half hour walk to fetch clean water, you often compromise with proper hygiene. Juyang Hui from North Korea had to walk half an hour twice a day to reach the nearest well and fetch water for her family. The 34-year-old woman lives with her husband and eight-year-old son in the village of Sony outside Kujang. Water is heavy and when it has to be carried a long way home, it is used carefully without being wasted. Shower is an expensive luxury, and pots and pans may not get the full cleaning after use. And when the water is stored in large buckets, bacteria from handwashing after...
It is with excitement that the children explore their new toys that they become acquainted with for the first time in their lives.
There is hope for the people of North Korea, Kim Hartzner learned when he visited the country in November. It was a life-affirming visit, where he on first hand saw the enormous progress that has been made since the Mission East began to work there in 2012. Weakened, apathetic children with stick-thin arms and legs on cold concrete floors was the sight that met Kim Hartzner, when he visited the orphanage in Haeju in 2012. Chronic malnutrition made wounds in the children’s faces. The children’s lives was hanging in a thread, and it seemed impossible to make a difference in this misery. Today,...
Children at orphanage in North Korea. They suffer from cronic malnutrition.
Despite the harsh words of the past months, everything seems to be ‘business as usual’. This is the feeling when you are inside North Korea, according to Kim Hartzner, Managing Director of the Danish NGO Mission East.   He just returned from the country after visiting orphanages and victims of last year’s flooding.  - The dialogue with the local authorities is open and transparent. They seem sincerely interested in improving people’s lives and are sad when people live in poverty or lose their homes, says Kim Hartzner who returned from North Korea the 13th of July 2013. - When you meet people...
Some of the most vulnerable children in North Korea are children at orphanages. The majority does not get enough food and suffers from chronic malnutrition. Many are in danger of dying if they do not get help. See more pictures from the orphanages and read more here and here   Mission East is helping Mission East is right now helping these children by distributing food, clothes and educational materials.   See the children in North Korea get help   As the only Danish NGO who has access to these children in North Korea, Mission East has a unique chance to make a...
Kim Hartzner, Mission East, with children in North Korea
Typhoons and floods have caused huge damage in North Korea. By the end of August 2012 Managing Director Kim Hartzner returned from the country that is already struggling to feed it's population.   Find the pictures and read his story here:   "I came home from an extremely dramatic trip to North Korea by the end of August 2012. After five consecutive natural disasters the North Korean population of 25 million have now been exposed to a sixth – two typhoons in the course of three weeks, and two more expected this week. After the first typhoon at the end of July more than 212,000 people were...
North Korean children at an orphanage in Haeju.
Managing Director Kim Hartzner, has returned from a disturbing trip to North Korea. Read his story here:    "I have just returned from a very dramatic trip to North Korea (July 2012). Even though this year, the supplies of rice from the last harvest have lasted up until June, several store rooms for rice are now empty, and the outlook for the coming months is dark, especially after a period of 2½ months without rain. Read more about the food security situation in North Korea here   I was in North Korea with a colleague in order to monitor the distribution...

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