| Mission East
Binay Basyal in Mission East’s Erbil office. Photo: Peter Eilertsen.
Binay Basyal is Mission East’s country director in conflict-ridden Iraq. The Nepalese aid worker is no stranger to civil wars – he experienced one in his home country. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer What does it take to lead a Mission East office in a war zone? According to Binay Basyal, it requires a combination of calmness and indignation – on top of the necessary professional skills. “You feel pain and anger when you witness so much suffering as you do in Iraq. But you also need to stay calm,” stated the 41-year old Nepalese national who has led Mission East’s work in the conflict...
The preparations for distributing emergency relief to the many people escaping from Mosul have been going on for some time. It is necessary to be well prepared when facing such a major humanitarian crisis. Photo: Peter Eilertsen.
The Danish emergency aid specialist, Knud Andersen, has been in Iraq since October to coordinate Mission East’s efforts to help the many people who are fleeing Mosul. A humanitarian disaster of this scale requires a lot of planning – and flexibility. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer Distribution of emergency aid is like a giant jigsaw puzzle. A lot of pieces need to fall into place when the scale of a humanitarian crisis becomes as large as it is expected to be when the flow of refugees out of Mosul escalates. This is how the 42-year old Danish emergency aid specialist, Knud Andersen,...
Eight-year old Mahmoud suffers from a serious type of muscular dystrophy that ties him to a wheelchair. In his home city of Kirkuk, schools are rarely equipped to accommodate children like him. Photo: Peter Eilertsen.
Eight-year old Mahmoud has a serious disability, but the Mission East mobile child centre has inspired him to go back to school. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer When Mahmoud was five years old, he started feeling the symptoms of the disease that has now tied him to a wheelchair. A couple of years later, when he was in second grade, his school sent him home. It simply was not equipped to handle a pupil suffering from muscular dystrophy. Such are the conditions in Kirkuk in Northern Iraq where children with handicaps often miss out on a school education. At first, Mahmoud was resigned...
Jiihan and her family spent some of the cash assistance from Mission East on a heater and blankets. Photo: Peter Eilertsen.
In December 2015, displaced Iraqi families received help to cope with the winter cold. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer Jihan, her husband and their four children live in an unfinished concrete house. The window frames are big, gaping holes, and the “entrance door” to their temporary home is a thin piece of cloth. Many displaced Iraqis, who have fled the terrorist movement Islamic State, live like this. The big city of Kirkuk is full of them. Jihan and her family left their home city of Fallujah in 2014 and sought refuge here. At the time, there were no camps for the internally...
On 15 October, global handwashing day was celebrated at Mission East’s centre for displaced children in northern Iraq.
Infectious diseases can cost the lives of people who have fled from war. At the centres established by Mission East in northern Iraq, children who have fled from war learn how to keep infection away with soap and water. Red, blue and green finger paints are spread over plates all around the floor, and next to them are large, white sheets of paper ready to be decorated. After a while the paper sheets are littered with hand prints, and the many children in the room raise their coloured hands in excitement.  Serious matters lies behind laughter We are in one of the three centres in northern Iraq...
13-year-old Yasser dreams of coming to Kirkuk and studying to become a doctor. But because of the war in his country, it is a remote prospect.
First, their village was occupied by IS. After that, bombs fell. 13-year-old Yasser and his family are marked by the war they fled from. Now they get help from Mission East. The children are huddling in the cold, and women gather their shawls around their shoulders. It is mid-November, and winter is on the way in Iraq. If the family was at home in their village, it would be no problem. They would stay in their warm house, and there would be enough food from their farms. But they sit instead in an unfinished building on the run from a war which they have no stake in. Bombs fell on the village...
People who are displaced by the conflict in northern Iraq not only live in harsh conditions, but also struggle with the devastating psychological and social impacts of the conflict. But the psychosocial support provided at Mission East’s centres for women and children gives some a new hope for the future.
Everything changed for Ade and her children when they had to flee their home in Sinjar and leave everything behind one early morning last year. Life as an internally displaced person in northern Iraq is desperately hard, but at Mission East’s centre for support for displaced women and children, Ade gets the chance for a new beginning. By Mev Bardiqi with translation by Azad Rasho, relief workers, Northern Iraq "We know stories of Yazidis who have killed themselves because they are unable to cope with this situation," says Ade, a 35 year-old woman who is among Iraq’s 3.2 million displaced...
Orphans receive blankets
Mission East has once more given out winter help to the displaced people of Northern Iraq who are escaping from Islamic State. Secretary General, Kim Hartzner says “The displaced people are shaken, and their gratitude is touching”. The terror attack in Copenhagen cost two human lives and shocked Denmark. In Northern Iraq, one million people are on the run from the terrorist movement of Islamic State. The terrorists brutal misanthropy is going at full blast and murdering men, raping women and force marrying girls. “We must not forget them, not even when terror strikes Denmark and not when we,...

Pages