Burma | Mission East

Burma



Burma

Burma hungry children
Through simple means, the Mara people can grow more crops than previously and avoid hunger and debt. Photo: Mai Ki
A new Mission East project trains the poverty-stricken Mara people in cultivating crops all year round. It will provide children and adults with better nutrition. By Line Højland, Communications Officer – June 2018 Pawtlei and her old mother struggle to keep hunger at bay. They belong to the isolated Christian Mara people in Myanmar's Chin State, one of the least developed areas of the country. "Until now, my slash-and-burn farming can hardly secure food for three months per year. For nine months I must ask my brothers and relatives for help in some way," says the 56-year-old woman who lives...
 

Donate now

to help the most vulnerable

Burma is a country in Southeast Asia with a population of approx. 60 million people. As many countries in that region, it has had a turbulent history. In recent years foreign relationships started to improve, resulting in eased economic sanctions.
 
These changes allow for the first time in decades for the international community to help the most vulnerable in Burma suffering under the consequences of decade long internal conflicts and natural disasters.
 
The people in remote areas are the ones that are suffering the most, especially if they constitute a Christian minority ethnic group. In collaboration with the local partner, Together for Sustainable Development  or TSD (formerly known as Social Development Department or SDD), Mission East responds to the needs of the Mara people, resident in the Chin state.
 
The community established a boarding school to ensure its future through education of the children. From 2013 to 2016, Mission East provided help for the children in form of food supplies. Mission East also supports TSD's efforts to become a more professional organisation, thus enabling it to be even more useful to the Mara people.
 
 
Through simple means, the Mara people can grow more crops than previously and avoid hunger and debt. Photo: Mai Ki

A new Mission East project trains the poverty-stricken Mara people in cultivating crops all year round. It will provide children and adults with better nutrition.

By Line Højland, Communications Officer – June 2018

Thadak Hlaing comes from a poor background in Maraland. That doesn’t stop her from wanting to pass the coveted national exam. Photo: Alex Ramos-Peña

Thadak Hlaing’s dream is to pass her exam and do charity work for the benefit of her people. At the COME school she gets help with the difficult exams.

By Alex Ramos-Peña, HQ Programme Manager and Line Højland, Communications Officer – June 2018

Mai Ki benefits from her partnership with Mission East. Here, she is participating in a training programme with a colleague. Photo: Mission East

Mai Ki and her colleagues from the local organisation Together for Sustainable Development are working to eradicate food shortages among their vulnerable fellow countrymen and -women in Myanmar. Cooperation with Mission East has taught them to work more efficiently.

By Kim Wiesener, Communication Manager, September 2017

Vangohkhih is in 6th grade and views the COME school as a mother and father for orphans.

Education is important. But it is equally important to eat enough food to grow, thrive, and study.. At the COME school in Burma, the children of the Mara people get education as well as food thanks to the aid from Mission East. Here are three accounts on the daily life in Maraland, Chin State, before and after COME school.